Karakuri ningyō

June 26, 2008

Karakuri ningyō (からくり人形?) are mechanized puppets or automata from Japan from the 18th century to 19th century. The word ‘karakuri’ means a “mechanical device to tease, trick, or take a person by surprise”. It implies hidden magic, or an element of mystery. In Japanese ningyō is written as two separate characters, meaning person and shape. It may be translated as puppet, but also by doll or effigy. The dolls’ gestures provided a form of entertainment.

Three main types of karakuri exist: Butai karakuri (舞台からくり stage karakuri?) were used in theatre. Zashiki karakuri (座敷からくり tatami room karakuri?) were small and were played with in rooms. Dashi karakuri (山車からくり festival car karakuri?) were used in religious festivals, where the puppets were used to perform reenactments of traditional myths and legends.

They influenced the Noh, Kabuki and Bunraku theatre.Karakuri ningyō (からくり人形?) are mechanized puppets or automata from Japan from the 18th century to 19th century. The word ‘karakuri’ means a “mechanical device to tease, trick, or take a person by surprise”. It implies hidden magic, or an element of mystery. In Japanese ningyō is written as two separate characters, meaning person and shape. It may be translated as puppet, but also by doll or effigy. The dolls’ gestures provided a form of entertainment.

Three main types of karakuri exist: Butai karakuri (舞台からくり stage karakuri) were used in theatre. Zashiki karakuri (座敷からくり tatami room karakuri) were small and were played with in rooms. Dashi karakuri (山車からくり festival car karakuri) were used in religious festivals, where the puppets were used to perform reenactments of traditional myths and legends. They influenced the Noh, Kabuki and Bunraku theatre.


Kirsty Boyle has a great site about her Karakuri research

http://www.karakuri.info/


KAPROS and MUSE

June 20, 2008

KAPROS and MUSE were a research project of Tsukuba UNIV titled “Modeling the Evaluation Structure of KANSEI” 1997-2002. The meaning of “KANSEI” is similar to “emotional engineering”. The body of these robots were made and designed in “kyushu institute of design (computer related design laboratory)” 1999 . The software and navigation system was developed by intelligent robot laboratory at Tsukuba UNIV. (Maeyama shoichi). Also involved was Tamon Hosoya who now teaches at Sapporo City University.


Synthetic Times exhibition; China & Henrik Menné

June 20, 2008

National Art Museum of China (NAMOC)
No. 1 Wusi Street Dongcheng District
Beijing 100010 P.R.China
Jun 10, 2008 -July 3, 2008

http://www.mediartchina.org


Henrik Menné, 56L, 2004, Denmark.

The dynamic sculptures by Henrik Menné are basically about process, (im)balance, and organizing matter by means of rigid systems on the one hand and chance on the other.

The majority of Menné’s production consists of machines or arrangements temporarily put to work when exhibited. The visible process is always silent, controlled, and structured by repetitive movements as the machines transform a single material – plastic, wax, metal or stone – into distinct objects. The objects are seldom treated as autonomous works of art. They are destroyed or the material recycled after the exhibition.

Although closed and often self-referring, the system of Menné’s processual sculptures both change the environment and is sensible to changes in the environment. The instability of the exhibition space is what causes the important marginal variations in the almost identical objects produced by a particular machine.

The process of 56L seems self-evident, and, like other works by Henrik Menné, 56L displays an immense effort and obsessive trait by putting forces such as gravity and the well-known qualities of a material into play.

56L (2004) consists of solid glue, a fan, iron, a heating element, and an engine. The dimensions of the work are variable (machine 180x150x150 cm).

56L produces a white web of glue. The machine heats up solid glue, which then flows down in thin threads in front of a fan that blows the strings in different directions. As a temporary result in which the history of the white structure is contained, the web takes the shape of the object or surface on which it settles.

The intriguing low-tech and analogue character of Henrik Menné’s works illustrates the principle behind the organization of the particular sculpture. Despite this rational transparency, works by Menné almost always appear logically impossible and tremendously beautiful.

Biography
Henrik Menné (born 1973) lives and works in Copenhagen (Denmark). He graduated from the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in 2002 and is represented by Galleri Tom Christoffersen (Cph).

Website
http://www.tomchristoffersen.dk/artists/henrik_menne/henrik_menne.html


ULTRA FACTORY in KUAD

June 12, 2008

I am currently a artist in residence at S-AIR in sunny Sapporo, Hokkaido, and I am reminded of the great artist Kenji Yanobe. Looks like he has a new studio called UltraFactory